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Kehte-ayak Council: Guiding FNUniv Through Tradition and Innovation

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Kehte-ayak Council: Guiding FNUniv Through Tradition and Innovation

May 1, 2024

The Kehte-ayak (Elders) Council at the app continues to be a pivotal element of the university community, providing spiritual and cultural guidance across its campuses in Regina, Saskatoon, and Prince Albert. Established in 2015, the council, consisting of Elders, Elders’ Helpers, and Knowledge Keepers, integrates traditional Indigenous knowledge into university programs and supports students’ academic and spiritual needs.

Throughout the 2022-2023 academic year, the council was active in several significant events. Notable activities included a Traditional Campus Naming ceremony at Sturgeon Lake First Nations, where the campus was named nēwoskān, symbolizing unity and wholeness. The council also welcomed new members Margaret Rockthunder and Dennis Omeasoo, who brought fresh perspectives to the ongoing cultural initiatives.

Innovative projects such as the Medicinal Plants project led by Dr. Vincent Ziffle and discussions on Indigenous Advising Theory highlighted the council’s commitment to education and cultural enrichment. A transgender workshop spearheaded by Jack Saddleback and participation in the National Elders Gathering in Edmonton emphasized the council’s role in addressing contemporary issues like reconciliation and cultural revitalization.

The year also saw the sad passing of three respected council members, whose contributions to the university and broader communities were fondly remembered.

As the council meets thrice annually and participates in various ceremonies and educational initiatives, it remains an essential conduit for cultural preservation and academic support at app.

To see the 2022-2023 Report click here.

Stay tuned for the 2023-2024 report coming soon.

The Kehte-ayak (Elders) Council at the app continues to be a pivotal element of the university community, providing spiritual and cultural guidance across its campuses in Regina, Saskatoon, and Prince Albert. Established in 2015, the council, consisting of Elders, Elders’ Helpers, and Knowledge Keepers, integrates traditional Indigenous knowledge into university programs and supports students’ academic and spiritual needs.

Throughout the 2022-2023 academic year, the council was active in several significant events. Notable activities included a Traditional Campus Naming ceremony at Sturgeon Lake First Nations, where the campus was named nēwoskān, symbolizing unity and wholeness. The council also welcomed new members Margaret Rockthunder and Dennis Omeasoo, who brought fresh perspectives to the ongoing cultural initiatives.

Innovative projects such as the Medicinal Plants project led by Dr. Vincent Ziffle and discussions on Indigenous Advising Theory highlighted the council’s commitment to education and cultural enrichment. A transgender workshop spearheaded by Jack Saddleback and participation in the National Elders Gathering in Edmonton emphasized the council’s role in addressing contemporary issues like reconciliation and cultural revitalization.

The year also saw the sad passing of three respected council members, whose contributions to the university and broader communities were fondly remembered.

As the council meets thrice annually and participates in various ceremonies and educational initiatives, it remains an essential conduit for cultural preservation and academic support at app.

To see the 2022-2023 Report click here.

Stay tuned for the 2023-2024 report coming soon.

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